Stats & Probability

In this topic, we will look at

  • Different forms of data presentations and graphs
  • Statistical measures
  • Linear Correlation
  • Probability and Compound Events
  • Conditional Probability
  • Discrete Random Variables
  • Binomial Distribution
  • Normal Distribution
  • Continuous Random Variables
  • Poisson Distribution


  • Conditional Probability

    You may well have tried the Monty Hall problem, a question based on the game show 'Let's Make a Deal'. In the game show, extra information is given about the whereabouts of a prize. If you use this extra information, you are more likely to choose the corre

  • Binomial Distribution

    The Binomial distribution is an example of a discrete random variable. It has two parameters n (number of trials) and p (probability of success of one trial): X~B(n , p). For a situation to be described using a binomial model, the following must be true

  • Poisson Distribution

    Although you might be able to model the number of fish in a pond using the Poisson distribution, the name Poisson comes from the French mathematician, Siméon Poisson from whom the distribution was named. The Poisson Distribution can model some discrete ran

  • Normal Distribution

    The normal distribution is an extremely useful statistical distribution. Data for heights and weights of adults and objects produced by machines, for example, tend to follow the normal (bell-shaped) distribution. More importantly, if we take large enough s